Runger: The Struggle Is Real

Why did no one ever tell me about real runger? I admit, I should have known that marathon training would require significantly more sustenance to keep me going, and fueling is always really important when training for any athletic endeavor.  But I am hungry. ALL. THE. TIME.  Don’t get me wrong, I love food, and I especially love good, nutritious, and well-balanced food.  I am simply not used to eating this much food out of necessity.  I have been doing a lot of research recently to understand what I should be doing to manage my hunger and ensure I am still fueling properly and thoughtfully.  It is true, I did indulge in a donut last week, but otherwise I am really trying to maintain and healthy balance between good carbs, fueling proteins, healthy fats, and lots of fruits and veggies.  I have to accept the fact, however, that marathon training isn’t designed for weight loss. Maintenance, sure, but not weight loss.  At least I will be toned all over!

No really, I feel like I am always hungry.
No really, I feel like I am always hungry.

In my quest for runger enlightenment, I stumbled upon Amanda Brooks’ blog “Run to the Finish,” in which her “Ultimate Guide to Managing Marathon Hunger” has been a huge life-saver and healthy reminder.  In it she provides her top 10 tips for managing marathon training hunger, which is exactly what I was needing.  I’ll list them below, but please check out her post – it’s hugely helpful!

  1. Amanda recommends refueling immediately after a run with a recovery drink. I am a huge fan of green smoothies, so this has been a really useful reminder for me that I need to intake my smoothie sooner. If you haven’t heard of “Simple Green Smoothies,” you should check them out now.  They have tons of free recipes on their site and through social media, and their book is outstanding.  The book provides smoothies for all different purposes, including recovery.
  2. The post-workout meal should include a slightly higher amount of protein,
    Did I mention that these GF oat muffins are also great with Perfect Fit?
    Did I mention that these GF oat muffins are also great with Perfect Fit?

    whether through eggs, quinoa, lentils, chickpeas/hummus, etc. One of my favorites is cooking an egg and preparing half a cup of Love Grown Foods’ Simply Pure Super Oats, which incorporates quinoa and chia seeds.  I also sometimes top the oatmeal instead with a banana, half cup of blueberries and 5 strawberries, or you could even mix in your favorite nut butter.  I also love smoothies with Tone It Up’s Perfect Fit Protein, a great plant-based vegan protein powder.

  3. I am going to quote Amanda here, “Don’t fear fats”! And it’s true, but choose healthy and hearty saturated fats, like coconut oil in smoothies or when making eggs (which also helps enhance your energy levels) or avocados, also in smoothies or with lunch or dinner.  I am going to try this shrimp and avocado salad tonight for dinner, so you know that other half of avocado is going in my morning smoothie tomorrow!
  4. Do not wait too long to eat after your run, because this can lead to overeating. There are some days where I will grab a big bottle of water and make my recovery meal right after I return so I don’t get too rungry. Amanda also mentions incorporating 2-3 snacks throughout the day, so in essence you’re eating about 5 or so “meals” on a daily basis as needed.  Often I will go for bananas with nut butter, carrots and hummus, or a smaller green smoothie.
  5. Carbs are friends, not foes, as long as incorporated properly. Complex carbohydrates are the key, which you can get from veggies and whole grains.  Quinoa and oats are some of my favorite things, and even in baking I am turning to whole wheat and gluten-free flours, like oat flour.  Amanda provides useful links to carbo-load correctly, so it’s worth checking out.
  6. Controlling your sugars is essential. Although last week’s chocolate frosted donut was a real treat, I was aware that it was not adding any value to how I fuel my body.  Sugar has a sneaky way of making you feel hungry even if you aren’t, which can cause overeating.  When you’re already consuming more calories than normal, this is a very slippery slope you want to avoid.
  7. What else can I say? Sleep is so imperative for everything, really, and even more so when training. This is definitely an area of improvement for me.  Sleep can help balance your metabolism as well as give you the recharge your body so needs after intensive athletic exercise.  The standard 7-8 hours fall somewhat short when training for a marathon, and really we should be aiming for 9-10 hours.  My goal for the next 2 months – more sleep!
  8. Focus on the nutrients in food as much as the food itself. Fresh fruits and veggies are a runner’s friend. I know we all fuel differently before a race, and I admit that I cannot eat anything that is more challenging to digest (like raw foods), but the recovery benefits are incredible.  It is recommended to have about 5 -7 services of fruits and veggies a day. Thankfully I love green smoothies and probably should have stock in Chiquita bananas for as many as I consume daily…
  9. Electrolytes provide the power you need to carry on, and running causes us to sweat them out. Lack of electrolytes can cause fatigue and cramps, which no runner wants to experience during or after a run.  NUUN hydration provides fabulous tablets that dissolve easily in water, do not include sugars, and provide a great natural boost of electrolytes.  Post-run coconut water is another wonderful and natural way to replenish your body with electrolytes.
  10. I love Amanda’s last recommendation the best: “listen to your body.” If you are in tune with what your body is telling you, you’ll refuel properly and timely, avoiding the snowball effect of incredible insatiable hunger, overeating, or not eating enough.  She also recommends to drink water before refueling. You may just be dehydrated rather than craving more calories.
giphy
Yeah, that’s pretty accurate. Source

These are definitely some of the guidelines and recommendations I am going to hold

Saturday's 10K is a great local race on a nice flat course.
Saturday’s 10K is a great local race on a nice flat course.

onto for the next 9 weeks of my training plan.  On a side note, last week’s training went incredibly well!  I ran more than normal because the hubs and I had the Lucky Laces 10K (finished in 59:36, 9:36/mile!) on Saturday and a long run planned for Sunday.  Thankfully it was a good warm-up for Sunday’s run.  We completed 16.15 miles on Sunday in 2 hours, 40 minutes and 19 seconds.  It is great knowing I can run that far and under a 10 minute/mile pace!  Here’s hoping 10 more miles won’t bog me down too much…

Day of the Week Cross Training Miles Run
Monday 3/7/16 Yoga Sculpt N/A
Tuesday 3/8/16 Yoga Sculpt 4 mile run
Wednesday 3/9/16 N/A 3.55 mile run
Thursday 3/10/16 Zumba N/A
Friday 3/11/16 N/A 3.55 mile run
Saturday 3/12/16 TIU Bikini Arms 6.27 mile run
Sunday 3/13/16 N/A 16.15 mile run
Lucky Laces 10K was a success - nice, easy miles to prep for Sunday!
Lucky Laces 10K was a success – nice, easy miles to prep for Sunday!

I gave myself a nice running break yesterday, but I will be back at it this afternoon, with 17 miles planned for this weekend – eek!

What recommendations do you have for fueling during marathon training?  Anyone else experience some major runger?  How is your training plan going?

2 thoughts on “Runger: The Struggle Is Real

  1. Betsy

    Bill Rogers, champion marathoner before anyone was writing about how to train for the distance, used to get up in the middle of the night and eat mayonnaise by the spoonful.

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